Sedona City Attorney Robert Pickels didn’t hold back on his thoughts regarding a state bill that went into effect over the summer.

“This is one of the worst pieces of legislation I’ve ever seen,” he said in regard to Senate Bill 1487 that passed on May 7 and went into effect on Aug. 6. “This is just another example of the state legislature imposing its own will on local jurisdictions and taking away our ability to govern effectively at the local level.”

Fact: Short-term vacation rentals will soon be allowed in Sedona.

Myth: There will be no regulations associated with this practice.

On May 12, Gov. Doug Ducey signed Senate Bill 1350 into law. Because Sedona’s ban on short-term rentals is no longer valid, the city is developing policies around areas like licensing, registration of an emergency contact and collection of taxes on properties permitted to operate under the provisions of the law.

It’s being called a 10-year storm and based on some of the flooding it caused, it earned that distinction.

A major storm on Aug. 10, which dumped more than an inch of rain in less than an hour, resulted in damage to the Carroll Canyon Wash bank along city-owned property located at Shelby Drive, the site of Sedona Recycles. A city report states that the damage and lost work area in the southeast corner of the recycle center is fairly significant. The erosion damage from this storm also made it apparent that it would be prudent to stabilize the wash bank adjacent to the city’s major pump station.

Yavapai College officials say they’re making a concerted effort to improve the lines of communication between the college and the residents of the Verde Valley.

But it’s evident that there are still old wounds that have yet to heal. Many on this side of Mingus Mountains feel they’re not getting nearly enough bang for their tax buck in terms of the disproportionate amount of funding and resources that goes to the Prescott campus.

The four candidates running for three open seats on the Sedona-Oak Creek School District Governing Board agree on one thing: If elected, they would freeze SOCSD Superintendent David Lykins’ salary until district teachers’ earn a living wage.

“I think that’s the direction we should go,” candidate Heather Hermen said during the League of Women Voters Greater Verde Valley-hosted candidate forum held Wednesday, Sept. 28, at the Jewish Community of Sedona and the Verde Valley.

A month ago, Jeff Brumbaugh received something that came as quite a shock — an eviction notice taped to his door.

For the last year and a half, Brumbaugh and his wife have been living at the Royal Crest Apartments, a 16-unit complex [both one and two-bedroom units] on Sombart Lane off State Route 179. Compared to many who have been renting there for 10 years or more, the Brumbaughs were relative newcomers.

“In July we all had a letter taped to our front doors announcing that the complex had been sold,” he said. “We were the only ones who still had a lease contract — everyone else was already month to month. Then, on Aug. 29, we all got another letter stating that we had to be out by Oct. 31 because they were turning the complex into daily and weekly rentals.”

This summer, the city of Sedona made it clear that it was against Senate Bill 1350, which allows short-term vacation rentals throughout the state. And while the city may have a limited voice, it doesn’t mean it has to be completely silent.  

On May 12, Gov. Doug Ducey signed Senate Bill 1350 into law and it goes into effect Jan. 1. Because Sedona’s ban on short-term rentals is no longer valid, the city is developing policies around areas like licensing, registration of an emergency contact and collection of taxes on properties permitted to operate under the provisions of the law.

On Tuesday, Oct. 11, the Sedona City Council will see a proposed ordinance that better defines what the city is allowed to require of those seeking to rent their homes on a short-term basis.

Within the city limits of Sedona live a little more than 10,000 residents. But on almost any given day that population more than doubles as a result of the area’s No. 1 industry — tourism.

Hundreds of business owners, residents and invited guests filled the ballroom at the Poco Diablo Resort on Tuesday, Sept. 20, to get an update on tourism in the area and its impact on the local economy during the Sedona Chamber of Commerce’s annual meeting.

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Sedona United States Mostly Cloud (day), 38 °F
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